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Aquatic Ecotoxicology

All of our Aquatic Toxicology Testing is available with full GLP compliance.

toxicology,ecosystem,algae

Effects on Aquatic Organisms (OECD 201, 202,203 and 235)

For the protection of the aquatic environment, it is important that testing assesses each of the trophic levels; primary producers (photosynthetic organisms), primary consumers (herbivores) and secondary consumers (predatory organisms). For the primary producers, tests are performed that provide the Effective Concentration test statistics (EC10, EC20, EC50) and corresponding No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (OECD 201). Where herbicidal activity is exhibited and a second species is required, the same endpoints are provided for the diatom Navicula pelliculosa. Where anti-microbial activity is known, a cyanobacterial species such as Anabaena flos-aquae can be used.

For the protection of primary consumers, tests are performed that provide the 24 and 48 hour median Effective Concentration (EC50), and where possible the No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for the cladoceran Daphnia magna (OECD 202). Where an insecticidal mode of action is known or insecticidal activity is exhibited and a second species is required the same endpoints are provided for the dipteran Chironomus riparius (OECD 235). For the protection of secondary consumers, yet in order to minimise fish testing, a threshold approach is taken and a limit test performed wherever possible, with Oncorhynchus mykiss (OECD 203).


Aquatic Ecotoxicology from Fera

Long-term and Chronic Effects (OECD 210, 211, 218/219/233 and 305)

Where exposure of surface water is both likely and long-lasting due to the fate and stability of compounds, it is important that longer term chronic assessments are made for the relevant trophic levels. For the protection of primary consumers, tests are performed that provide the Effective Concentration test statistics (EC10, EC20) and corresponding No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for reproduction in the cladoceran Daphnia magna (OECD 211). Where insect growth regulation is known or accumulation in aquatic sediment is indicated, the same endpoints or provided for development of the dipteran Chironomus riparius (OECD 218/219 or OECD 233).

For the protection of secondary consumers (fish), tests are performed that provide the Effective Concentration test statistics (EC10, EC20) and corresponding No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for the Early Life Stage (OECD 210). Additionally, where bioconcentration is indicated, then relevant BCF and uptake/depuration rate constants are provided (OECD 305).


Effects on Aquatic Macrophytes (OECD 221, 238/239)

Primary producers are considered sufficiently protected by the OECD 201 test, unless herbicidal activity or plant growth regulation is known, then tests are performed that provide the Effective Concentration test statistics (EC10, EC20, EC50) and corresponding No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for the macrophyte Lemna minor (OECD 221). Additionally, if there are clear indications of effects on dicotyledons or monocotyledons, the same endpoints are provided for Myriophyllum spicatum (OECD 238/239) or Glyceria maxima respectively.


Aquatic Ecotoxicology from Fera

Endocrine Disrupting Properties (OECD 229/230 and 234)

Where the potential for endocrine disruption is considered, tests can be performed according the OECD Conceptual Framework for Testing and Assessment of Endocrine Disruptors at Level 3 and 4, including Screening Assays (OECD 229/230) and Development tests (OECD 234).


Mesocosm Testing - E-Flows Mesocosm Facility

For further refinement of identified risk, mesocosm studies can be used to evaluate the potential impact on aquatic organisms under field conditions.

Simulation of field conditions for edge-of-field surface waters is often a compromise, due to the difficulty in providing habitat of appropriate scale and quality for aquatic communities.

The Edge of Field Waterbody Safety Assessment Facility (E-Flows) is designed to be a state of the art mesocosm providing a realistic test bed for regulatory risk assessments.

The E-Flows design provides the first mesocosm facility that gives access to multiple fully flow-through streams at a field scale, which can safely receive compounds at the rates predicted to occur in the environment by models. This flow-through approach allows for accurate simulation of the expected field exposure and dissipation rates in realistic to worst case scenarios, providing suitable data for both Ecological Threshold Option (ETO-) and Ecological Recovery Option (ERO-) RACs. The design also incorporates sufficient replication to meet the Reliability Index 1 and includes provision for monitoring with GLP compliance.

Contact Us - Aquatic Ecotoxicology

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The SETAC Europe 27th Annual Meeting is dedicated to the use of multidisciplinary approaches to examine the impacts of stressors, chemicals, and technology on the environment. Also, to support the development of principles and practices for protection, enhancement and management of sustainable environmental quality and ecosystem integrity. Join us at 27th Annual SETAC EUROPE BRUSSELS 2017

Our Aquatic Ecotoxicology Capabilities

Fera can support our partners to meet the ever increasing testing capability in aquatic ecotoxicology for environmental risk assessments. All of our Aquatic Toxicology Testing is available with full GLP compliance.

Download our Latest Aquatic Ecotoxicology Leaflet